Colorado Irrevocable Trust

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Corporate Structures & Strategies

While no one wants to think about dying, it is definitely one of life's certainties. And because anything can happen at any time, it is best to be prepared now, regardless of your age.

A well-drafted irrevocable trust can allow your estate to avoid probate and reduce estate taxes, saving your loved ones considerable time and money.

In addition, holding assets in an irrevocable trust for the benefit of your loved ones will protect those assets from your creditors, which could be a key benefit if you have potential litigation issues.

What is a Will?

A basic Will is one of the simplest steps you can take in estate planning. A Will is a legal document that provides instructions after you pass away for the distribution of your property, care of your minor children, pets, and more.

When you die without a will in place, the intestacy laws of the state where you reside will determine how your property and possessions will be distributed to your heirs. This can result in your estate not being distributed in a manner you would have approved.

What is Probate?

Trusts were historically designed to separate the ownership, control and beneficiaries of assets from each other. This means a trust owns the assets, while a trustee administers/controls them and a party of your choosing (you) benefits from them. Domestic asset protection trusts create a distance between you and your assets and any possible distributions.

Unfortunately, probate cost money, and sometimes a considerable amount of money. Some of the costs involved in probate include:

  • Court fees
  • Attorney fees
  • Accounting fees
  • Appraisal fees
  • Bonds fees
  • And more

Many estimates put the cost of probate at anywhere from 3 - 8% percent of an estate's assets. What's more, because probate is a court process, it can take a long time to settle–– one month to more than a year.

What is a Trust?

A trust is a legal arrangement whereby one party (the trustor) allows another party (the trustee) to hold property for the benefit of a third party (the beneficiary). One of the major appeals of a trust, as an estate planning tool, is that it can enable your estate to avoid probate after you pass away.

Because a trust usually avoids probate, your heirs will typically inherit your assets much faster through a trust than through a Will. Furthermore, trusts can be structured in many different ways and can dictate exactly how your assets will pass to its beneficiaries.

Revocable vs. Irrevocable Trusts in Colorado

There are basically two broad categories of trusts:

  1. Revocable; and
  2. Irrevocable

Revocable Trusts

A revocable trust will enable you to dictate what happens to your property after you pass away or become incapacitated.

In addition, with a revocable trust, you can modify or change these designations whenever you want to reflect changes in your estate or beneficiaries.

You can also designate yourself the trustee of a revocable trust and maintain control over the trust assets while you are alive.

On the other hand, with a revocable trust, you will still be exposed to estate taxes. But not only that, while you are alive, the trust assets can be accessed by your creditors to satisfy outstanding financial liabilities.

Irrevocable Trusts

If your primary goals are to protect your assets and to minimize estate taxes, then an irrevocable trust may be a better option for you. An irrevocable trust moves your assets out of your estate and beyond your creditors reach and can avoid both estate taxes and probate.

The primary difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust is that an irrevocable trust cannot be changed or modified once it has been created. Consequently, once you create the trust and place assets into it, you relinquish control over the assets and won't be able to modify, change, or cancel the trust.

An irrevocable trust is often preferred over a revocable trust because:

  1. It can minimize the amount of estate taxes by moving assets out of your estate; and
  2. The assets held in an irrevocable trust are usually beyond the reach of any lawsuit against you.

It is important to keep in mind, however, that you can have multiple trusts and different combinations of them. An experienced estate planning attorney can assist with understanding how various types of trusts can be used in combination to meet your estate planning objectives.

For More information contact a qualified and experienced Colorado estate planning attorney today.

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Colorado LLC Attorney, LLC

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